Hounds list of all hound breeds

Hounds

Hounds are the original hunting dogs, many pre-dating the gun-assisting hunters in their sporting group. There is a great deal of diversity, both temperamental and physical, within this group, a history of hunting assistance often being the only common bond among some of the hound breeds. In size, they range from the tall and lanky Irish wolfhound to the short-legged dachshund. These dog breeds originally assisted hunters in the field with either excellent scenting abilities or exceptional speed.

Afghan Hound

Hounds Afghan Hound

The Afghan Hound, with its striking appearance and elegant demeanor, was originally bred in the mountainous regions of Afghanistan. Its development was influenced by several key purposes:

  1. Hunting: The primary role of the Afghan Hound was as a hunting dog. They were used to hunt large game, such as deer and leopards, in the rugged terrain of the Afghan mountains. Their speed, agility, and keen sight made them adept at this task.
  2. Adaptation to Harsh Climates: The Afghan Hound’s long, flowing coat is not just for show; it served a practical purpose in protecting the dog from the harsh, cold climate of the high-altitude regions where it was bred.
  3. Independent Hunting Style: Afghan Hounds were bred to hunt independently, often out of sight of their human companions. This required them to be intelligent, independent, and capable of making decisions on their own during the hunt.
  4. Companionship and Status Symbol: In addition to being hunting dogs, Afghan Hounds were also kept as status symbols and companions by the Afghan nobility. Their distinctive and elegant appearance contributed to this status.
  5. Endurance and Stamina: The breed was developed to have high endurance and stamina to cope with the demanding landscape and the needs of long hunting expeditions.

The Afghan Hound’s exact origins are somewhat mysterious and steeped in folklore, as the breed’s development was largely isolated until the 19th century when they were brought to Great Britain. Today, the Afghan Hound is known more for its unique beauty and grace in the show ring than for its hunting prowess. Despite their aloof and dignified demeanor, Afghan Hounds are known to be affectionate and loyal with their owners. They require regular grooming due to their long coat and are best suited to homes that can accommodate their exercise needs and independent nature.


Basenji

Hounds Basenji

The Basenji is a breed of hunting dog bred from stock that originated in central Africa. Most of the major kennel clubs place the breed in the Hound Group more specifically, in the sighthound type.

The Basenji, a unique and ancient breed, originates from Central Africa and was bred for several specific purposes:

  1. Hunting: The primary role of the Basenji was as a hunting dog. They were used to flush small game into nets and to control village rodent populations. Their speed, agility, and keen sight and smell made them excellent hunters.
  2. Silent Tracking: One of the most distinctive features of the Basenji is its lack of a traditional bark. Instead, they make a unique sound known as a “barroo,” due to the shape of their larynx. This “silent” nature was beneficial in hunting, as it allowed them to stealthily stalk prey.
  3. Independent Hunting Style: Basenjis are known for their high intelligence and independent nature. They were bred to hunt independently, making decisions on their own, which is reflected in their sometimes aloof and independent demeanor.
  4. Companionship: Beyond hunting, Basenjis were also valued as companions. They are known for their strong bonds with their families, though they can be reserved around strangers.
  5. Physical Adaptation to a Hot Climate: The Basenji’s short coat, tightly curled tail, and erect ears reflect adaptations to the hot, tropical climate of Africa. Additionally, they are known for their cat-like grooming behavior, helping to keep their coat clean and reducing odors.

The Basenji is one of the oldest breeds, with evidence of similar-looking dogs found in ancient Egyptian artifacts. They were not introduced to Europe until the 19th century and to America in the mid-20th century. Today, the Basenji is appreciated for its intelligence, playful nature, and unique characteristics. Their grooming needs are minimal, but they require regular exercise and mental stimulation, as well as patient, consistent training due to their independent nature.


Basset Hound

Hounds Basset Hound

The Basset Hound is a short-legged breed of dog of the hound family. The Basset Hound, a breed with a distinctive appearance, was originally bred in France and Belgium for specific hunting purposes:

  1. Scent Hunting: The primary role of the Basset Hound was to hunt small game, particularly hares and rabbits, using their exceptional sense of smell. They are one of the best scent-tracking dogs, second only to the Bloodhound in their olfactory abilities.
  2. Hunting on Foot: Basset Hounds were bred for hunters who tracked their quarry on foot. Their short legs and slow pace allowed hunters to follow them without the need for horses.
  3. Stalking in Dense Cover: Their low stature enabled them to easily maneuver through dense underbrush while tracking game. The long ears of the Basset Hound may also help in trapping scents close to the nose while they track.
  4. Pack Hunting: Basset Hounds were bred to hunt in packs, so they are typically very social with other dogs and good at working cooperatively. This trait also makes them generally friendly and sociable animals.
  5. Endurance: Despite their leisurely pace, Basset Hounds have good stamina and can track scents over long distances, which was essential for hunting purposes.

The Basset Hound’s development focused on creating a dog with a powerful nose and a body well-suited to scent hunting. The breed’s long body, short legs, and loose skin are all adaptations for its role as a scent hound.

Today, while they are less commonly used for hunting, Basset Hounds are popular as family pets, known for their gentle and laid-back nature. Their distinctive appearance, with droopy eyes and long ears, adds to their appeal. They are affectionate and patient, making them good companions, especially in households with children. However, they require regular exercise to prevent obesity and can benefit from engaging in activities that utilize their strong sense of smell.


Beagle

Hound breeds Beagle

The Beagle is a breed of small to medium-sized dog. A member of the hound group, it is similar in appearance to the foxhound, but smaller with shorter legs and longer, softer ears. The Beagle, a breed known for its keen sense of smell and melodious bark, was primarily bred in England for specific hunting purposes:
  1. Scent Hunting: The primary role of the Beagle was to hunt small game, especially hares and rabbits. They are scent hounds, using their exceptional sense of smell to track and chase game.
  2. Hunting in Packs: Beagles were bred to hunt in packs, meaning they needed to be sociable and cooperative with other dogs. This pack mentality also contributes to their friendly and outgoing nature with humans.
  3. Suitability for Hunting on Foot: Unlike larger hounds that were followed on horseback, Beagles were developed for hunters who tracked on foot. Their size and pace were ideal for this method of hunting, allowing the hunters to keep up with the dogs without the need for horses.
  4. Stamina and Persistence: Beagles have good stamina and are tenacious hunters. They were bred to tirelessly follow a scent trail over long distances.
  5. Vocalization: Beagles are known for their distinctive bark and howl, especially when on the hunt. This vocalization was useful for alerting hunters to their location and the status of the hunt.

The breed’s development focused on enhancing its ability to track scents over long distances while being manageable enough for foot hunters to follow. The Beagle’s size, keen nose, and stamina made it a popular choice for rabbit and hare hunting.

Today, Beagles are popular family pets, appreciated for their friendly disposition, compact size, and relatively low maintenance needs. They are also used in professional scent detection roles, such as in airports for contraband food and drugs detection, due to their exceptional olfactory skills. While they are generally good-natured and sociable, their strong hunting instincts can sometimes lead to a propensity to roam if they catch an interesting scent. Regular exercise and mental stimulation are important for this energetic and inquisitive breed.


Bloodhound

Hound dogs Bloodhound

The Bloodhound, a breed renowned for its extraordinary sense of smell, was originally bred for tracking and hunting purposes:

  1. Tracking and Hunting: Bloodhounds were primarily bred for tracking deer and wild boar during hunting expeditions. They have an unparalleled ability to follow scent trails over long distances and through challenging terrain, making them invaluable in medieval hunting.
  2. Man-Trailing Abilities: Beyond hunting game, Bloodhounds were also used for tracking people. This skill made them early precursors to modern-day search and rescue dogs and they are still used in law enforcement and search and rescue operations today.
  3. Endurance and Strength: Bloodhounds were bred to have the stamina and strength to follow trails for long periods. They are capable of covering vast distances without tiring easily, which was essential for both hunting and tracking purposes.
  4. Gentle and Amiable Nature: Despite their formidable tracking ability, Bloodhounds are known for their gentle and friendly demeanor. This temperament made them good companions for hunters and later for families.
  5. Distinct Physical Characteristics: The breed’s loose, wrinkled skin; long, drooping ears; and powerful nose are all physical adaptations that enhance their scenting ability. The wrinkles around their face help trap scent particles, and the long ears help to waft scents towards the nose.

Originating from Europe, possibly as far back as the Middle Ages, the Bloodhound’s lineage is believed to have been refined in Belgium and France. The breed was highly prized for its tracking skills, and its name is thought to derive from its status as the “blooded hound,” or aristocratic hound, rather than from any blood-tracking ability.

Today, while they are less commonly used in hunting, Bloodhounds have found a significant role in modern law enforcement and search and rescue operations due to their tracking skills. They are also valued as family pets, known for their affectionate nature and compatibility with children and other pets. However, they do require ample space and exercise, as well as patient, consistent training.


Borzoi

Hounds Borzoi

The Borzoi, also called the Russian wolfhound descended from dogs brought to Russia from central Asian countries, it is similar in shape to a greyhound, and is also a member of the sighthound family.

The Borzoi breed that was specifically developed in Russia for several distinct purposes:

  1. Wolf Hunting: The primary role of the Borzoi was to hunt wolves. The breed was developed by crossing various sighthounds with local Russian breeds to create a large, fast dog capable of chasing down and holding wolves until the hunter arrived. Their speed, agility, and endurance were key attributes for this role.
  2. Coursing Game: Beyond wolf hunting, Borzois were also used for coursing other game, such as foxes and hares. Their keen sight and swift running ability made them effective in this type of hunting as well.
  3. Status Symbol: Borzois were favored by Russian nobility and were often associated with the lavish lifestyles of the Tsars. Owning Borzois was a status symbol, and they were bred not only for function but also for their elegant and aristocratic appearance.
  4. Adaptation to Harsh Climates: The breed’s long, silky coat provided protection against the cold Russian weather, making them well-suited to the harsh climate.
  5. Companionship: In addition to their hunting prowess, Borzois were also valued as companions. Their calm and gentle demeanor made them well-suited for life in the aristocratic households of Russia.

The Borzoi’s elegance and grace, combined with its hunting abilities, made it a highly esteemed breed among the Russian nobility. Today, while they are no longer used for wolf hunting, Borzois are admired for their beauty, gentle nature, and athletic prowess. They are well-suited to various dog sports that involve speed and agility, and they make calm and affectionate pets. Due to their strong prey drive, they require proper socialization and training, and they are best suited to homes with enough space for them to exercise.


Black & Tan Coonhound

Hounds Black and Tan Coonhound

The Black and Tan Coonhound, a breed developed in the United States, was specifically bred for certain hunting purposes:

  1. Raccoon Hunting: The primary purpose of the Black and Tan Coonhound was to track and tree raccoons. They are scent hounds, using their exceptional sense of smell to follow the trail of raccoons and other game, often at night.
  2. Treeing Ability: Apart from simply tracking, these dogs were also bred for their ability to “tree” their quarry. This means they would chase an animal, such as a raccoon, up a tree and then bay loudly to alert the hunter to its location.
  3. Versatility in Hunting: While their main quarry was raccoons, Black and Tan Coonhounds were also used to hunt other game, including deer, bear, and mountain lion, demonstrating their versatility and adaptability in various hunting scenarios.
  4. Endurance and Stamina: These coonhounds were bred for endurance, able to sustain long hunts over challenging terrain. Their physical build and strength reflect these requirements.
  5. Loud, Melodious Bay: A distinctive feature of the breed is its deep, melodious bay, which was important for hunters to track the dog’s movements and location, especially in dense forests or at night.
  6. Companionable Nature: Despite their prowess as hunting dogs, Black and Tan Coonhounds are known for their friendly and easygoing nature, making them suitable as family pets as well.

The breed’s development involved crossing the Bloodhound for its keen sense of smell and the Foxhound for its hunting ability and stamina. The Black and Tan Coonhound’s coat color and pattern are also distinctive features, giving the breed its name.

Today, while still used for hunting in some areas, the Black and Tan Coonhound is also appreciated as a companion animal. They are known for their loyalty, relaxed disposition, and sociability. However, they do require regular exercise and mental stimulation, and their strong hunting instincts may lead to a propensity to follow scents, emphasizing the need for secure containment and training.


Mudhol Hound

Hounds Mudhol Hound

The Mudhol Hound, also known as the Caravan Hound, is an Indian breed of sighthound that was bred for specific purposes:

  1. Hunting: The primary role of the Mudhol Hound was for hunting small and medium-sized game such as hare and blackbuck. They are sighthounds, relying on their acute vision and incredible speed to spot and chase down prey.
  2. Guarding and Protection: In addition to hunting, Mudhol Hounds were also used for guarding homes and livestock. Their alert and vigilant nature made them effective protectors.
  3. Adaptation to Local Environment: Bred in the Deccan Plateau of India, Mudhol Hounds are well-adapted to harsh climates. They have a lean and athletic build, with a short coat that helps them cope with the hot, arid conditions.
  4. Endurance and Speed: These dogs were bred for their high endurance and speed, essential traits for pursuing game over long distances in open terrain.
  5. Companionship: While their primary function was as working dogs, Mudhol Hounds were also valued as companions, known for their loyalty and grace.

The breed is known for its elegant appearance, characterized by a lean body, long legs, and a narrow head. It shares similarities with other sighthound breeds such as the Saluki and the Greyhound.

In recent years, the Mudhol Hound has gained recognition and has been promoted by various Indian kennel clubs. The breed is also known for its presence in Indian history and culture, being kept by royalty and nobility in the past. Today, they are appreciated for their hunting skills, speed, and loyal nature. As with many sighthounds, they require space to run and exercise, making them more suited to homes with access to open areas.


Dachshund

Hounds Dachshund

The Dachshund, a breed with a distinctive long-bodied and short-legged appearance, was originally bred in Germany for specific hunting purposes:

  1. Badger Hunting: The primary role of the Dachshund, which literally means “badger dog” in German, was to hunt badgers. Their elongated body and short legs were ideal for digging into badger dens, and their tenacity made them well-suited for confronting these fierce animals.
  2. Versatility in Hunting Other Burrowing Animals: In addition to badgers, Dachshunds were also used to hunt other burrowing animals such as foxes and rabbits. Their keen sense of smell and ability to navigate through tight underground passages made them effective in this role.
  3. Above and Below Ground Hunting: While Dachshunds were primarily used for underground hunting, they were also adept at tracking game above ground. Their versatility in hunting made them valuable to their owners.
  4. Alert and Loyal Companions: Beyond hunting, Dachshunds were also cherished as loyal and alert companions. They are known for their courage, intelligence, and lively personality.
  5. Distinctive Physical Traits: The breed’s unique physical attributes, including a long back, short legs, and robust build, were specifically developed to aid in their burrowing and hunting activities. These traits enable the Dachshund to excavate earth and maneuver through tunnels.

Dachshunds come in three varieties: the standard size, originally used for badger hunting; the miniature, developed for hunting smaller prey like rabbits; and the kaninchen, German for “rabbit,” which is even smaller. They also come in different coat types: smooth, long-haired, and wire-haired.

Today, while they are less commonly used for hunting, Dachshunds are popular pets, known for their distinctive shape, bold and curious nature, and suitability for various living environments. However, due to their unique body structure, they are prone to spinal issues, so it’s important to handle them carefully and maintain a healthy weight.


Scottish Deerhound

Hounds Scottish Deerhound

The Scottish Deerhound, or simply the Deerhound, is a large breed of hound dog once bred to hunt the Red Deer by coursing. The Scottish Deerhound, a breed known for its majestic appearance and gentle demeanor, was originally bred in Scotland for specific purposes:

  1. Deer Hunting: The primary role of the Scottish Deerhound was to hunt red deer. They were used by Scottish clans for this purpose for centuries. Their large size, speed, and strength made them ideally suited to chase and bring down deer, a task requiring both endurance and power.
  2. Coursing Ability: These hounds were bred for coursing, which is the pursuit of game by sight rather than scent. Their keen eyesight and fast pace enabled them to excel in this hunting method.
  3. Adaptation to Rough Terrain: Bred to hunt in the Highlands of Scotland, Scottish Deerhounds needed to be hardy and capable of handling rough, mountainous terrain. Their wiry coat provided protection against harsh weather conditions.
  4. Companionship and Loyalty: In addition to their hunting capabilities, Scottish Deerhounds were also valued for their loyalty and companionship. They were often kept by the Scottish nobility and were seen as a symbol of status and prestige.
  5. Gentle and Dignified Nature: Despite their size and hunting prowess, Scottish Deerhounds are known for their gentle and dignified temperament. They were bred to be amiable and easy to train, qualities that made them excellent companions both in the field and at home.

The Scottish Deerhound’s ancestry is ancient, with similar dogs existing in Scotland before recorded history. They share lineage with other sighthounds like the Greyhound but are larger and more robust, suited to the demanding task of deer hunting.

Today, while they are no longer widely used for hunting, Scottish Deerhounds are cherished for their noble appearance, gentle nature, and affectionate disposition. They require regular exercise and space to roam, and their calm temperament makes them well-suited to family life. Their size and need for space, however, mean they are best suited to homes with ample room and access to open areas for exercise.


Drever

Hounds Drever

The Drever is a short-legged scenthound from Sweden used for hunting deer and other game. The Drever is descended from the Westphalian Dachsbracke, a type of German hound called Bracke.

The Drever was bred for specific hunting purposes:

  1. Deer Hunting: The primary role of the Drever was in hunting deer, particularly roe deer. They are scent hounds, using their strong sense of smell to track game.
  2. Versatility in Hunting Smaller Game: Although they were primarily used for deer, Drevers were also adept at hunting smaller game like foxes and hares. Their versatility made them valuable to hunters in various environments.
  3. Adaptation to Swedish Terrain: Bred in Sweden, Drevers needed to be hardy and capable of working in its varied landscapes, including forests, fields, and mountainous areas. Their short legs and long body are adaptations that allowed them to move efficiently through dense underbrush and snow.
  4. Stamina and Endurance: Drevers were bred to have the stamina and endurance necessary to pursue game over long distances and often in challenging conditions.
  5. Barking to Signal Hunters: An important trait of the Drever is its persistent barking when on a scent trail. This characteristic was bred into the dog to help hunters locate the dog and the game it is tracking.

The Drever originated from the Westphalian Dachsbracke, a type of German hound. It was brought to Sweden in the early 20th century, where it was further developed to suit local hunting conditions. The breed was recognized as a distinct breed in Sweden in 1947.

Today, while the Drever is still used for hunting in Sweden and other parts of Scandinavia, it is also appreciated as a family pet due to its friendly and calm nature. They are known for being sociable, good with children, and adaptable to various living situations. However, like many hunting breeds, they require regular exercise and mental stimulation.


Finnish Spitz

Hounds Finnish Spitz

The Finnish Spitz, the national dog of Finland, was originally bred for specific hunting purposes:

  1. Bird Hunting: The primary role of the Finnish Spitz was to hunt birds, particularly grouse. Their hunting technique is unique; they track down birds, then bark to attract and hold the attention of the bird, allowing the hunter to approach.
  2. Barking Pointer: The Finnish Spitz is known as a “barking bird dog.” They use their sharp bark to indicate the location of game, a trait that was specifically encouraged in their breeding. Their barking can be very persistent and is used to both alert the hunter and keep the game (like birds) perched in place.
  3. Versatility in Hunting Small Game: Besides birds, they were also used for hunting other small game like squirrels and rabbits. Their keen sense of smell and alertness make them adept at locating various types of game.
  4. Adaptation to Harsh Climates: Originating in the cold, forested regions of Finland, the Finnish Spitz has a thick, double coat that provides insulation against cold weather.
  5. Endurance and Agility: This breed was developed to have high endurance and agility, suitable for long hunting trips in the diverse terrains of the Finnish wilderness.

The Finnish Spitz’s development as a breed has deep roots in the hunting traditions of Finland’s early settlers and indigenous Sami people. Over time, they have become a symbol of Finnish heritage.

Today, while they are still used for hunting in some areas, Finnish Spitzes are also popular as companion animals. They are known for their lively and friendly nature, making them suitable for families. They require regular exercise and mental stimulation due to their high energy levels. Their distinctive “yodeling” bark and beautiful fox-like appearance add to their appeal as pets. However, potential owners should be prepared for their vocal nature, which is a deeply ingrained aspect of the breed’s hunting heritage.


American Foxhound

Hounds American Foxhound

The American Foxhound is a breed of dog that is a cousin of the English Foxhound. They are scent hounds, bred to hunt foxes by scent.

The American Foxhound, a breed that originated in the United States, was specifically developed for hunting foxes:

  1. Fox Hunting: The primary role of the American Foxhound was to hunt foxes. They are scent hounds, using their exceptional sense of smell to track their quarry. The breed was developed to be faster and lighter than its cousin, the English Foxhound, to adapt to the different terrain and hunting conditions in America.
  2. Stamina and Speed: American Foxhounds were bred for endurance and speed to chase foxes over long distances. They needed to maintain a steady pace over a variety of terrains, from wooded areas to open fields.
  3. Pack Hunting: Similar to other foxhound breeds, American Foxhounds were bred to hunt in packs. As such, they needed to be cooperative with other dogs and responsive to human handlers.
  4. Adaptation to American Landscapes: The breed was developed to suit the larger, more varied landscapes of rural America compared to the more manicured hunting grounds of England. This adaptation required a more independent and versatile hunting style.
  5. Melodious Baying: A notable trait of the American Foxhound is its melodious bay, which was important for hunters to track the movement of the hounds during a hunt, especially when the dogs were out of sight.

The breed’s development involved the importation of English Foxhounds, which were then crossed with other breeds, possibly including French hounds and Irish hounds, to enhance their hunting abilities, speed, and adaptability to the American wilderness.

Today, while still used for hunting in some areas, American Foxhounds are also appreciated as companion animals, known for their friendly and easygoing nature. They are well-suited to active families or individuals who can provide them with ample exercise and outdoor activities. Their strong hunting instincts and love for the chase, however, mean they are best suited to homes where these traits can be accommodated and managed.


English Foxhound

Hound dogs English Foxhound

The English Foxhounds are scent hounds, bred to hunt foxes by scent. The English Foxhound, a breed with a storied history in Britain, was developed specifically for the sport of fox hunting:
  1. Fox Hunting: The primary purpose of the English Foxhound was to hunt foxes. They were used in organized fox hunts, which were a popular sport among the British upper class. Their keen sense of smell, stamina, and determination made them excellent at this task.
  2. Pack Hunting: English Foxhounds were bred to hunt in packs, so they needed to be cooperative with other dogs and able to work under the direction of a hunt master. Their sociable nature and ability to work in a team were key aspects of their breeding.
  3. Stamina and Endurance: These hounds were bred for endurance, able to sustain long hunts over varied terrain. They needed to keep up with both the fox and the mounted hunters, requiring both speed and stamina.
  4. Loud, Melodious Baying: An important characteristic of the English Foxhound is its loud, melodious bark or bay, which was used to communicate with hunters and other hounds during the hunt.
  5. Robust and Athletic Build: The breed’s physical attributes, including a muscular build, strong legs, and deep chest, were developed for the rigors of hunting and long periods of running.

The development of the English Foxhound was a carefully managed process, with meticulous records kept of breeding lines. The breed played a significant role in the traditional British fox hunt, a pursuit that has a complex and sometimes controversial place in British cultural history.

Today, while the traditional fox hunt has declined and, in many places, been replaced by drag hunting (where hounds chase a scent trail rather than a live fox), the English Foxhound is still valued for its endurance, good nature, and companionship. They are suitable for active families or individuals who can provide them with plenty of exercise and outdoor activities. Their pack mentality also makes them generally good with other dogs.


Greyhound

Hound breeds Greyhound

The Greyhound, one of the most ancient and distinctive dog breeds, was bred primarily for hunting and coursing:

  1. Coursing Game: Greyhounds were originally bred for coursing game, particularly hares and other small animals. They hunt primarily by sight, using their exceptional speed and agility to chase and catch fast-moving prey.
  2. Speed and Agility: One of the defining characteristics of Greyhounds is their incredible speed. They are among the fastest dog breeds, capable of reaching speeds up to 45 miles per hour. This speed, combined with their sleek, aerodynamic build, made them highly effective in hunting and coursing.
  3. Companion and Status Symbol: Beyond their hunting capabilities, Greyhounds have been kept as companions and status symbols throughout history. Their elegant appearance and gentle demeanor made them favored pets among nobility and royalty in many cultures.
  4. Adaptation to Diverse Environments: Originally bred in the Middle East and North Africa, Greyhounds are well-adapted to hot climates, as evidenced by their short coat and lean build. However, they have been successfully bred and used in various climates and terrains around the world.
  5. Racing and Competitive Sports: In modern times, Greyhounds became well-known for their role in dog racing, where their speed is showcased. They have also been involved in other canine sports such as lure coursing.

The Greyhound’s lineage dates back thousands of years, with depictions of similar-looking dogs appearing in ancient Egyptian, Greek, and Roman art. They were so admired for their hunting prowess that they were the only dog breed mentioned in the Bible.

Today, Greyhounds are popular as family pets, known for their calm and affectionate nature. They often enjoy a quiet lifestyle, contrary to what their racing history might suggest. These dogs are generally good-natured, gentle, and adaptable to living with families, including those with children. Despite their reputation for speed, many Greyhounds are quite content with moderate exercise and are known for being rather laid-back indoors.


Harrier

Hound dogs Harrier

The Harrier is a medium-sized hound used for hunting hares by trailing them. It resembles an English Foxhound but is smaller, though not as small as a Beagle.

The Harrier, a breed developed in England, was specifically bred for hunting hares, hence its name:

  1. Hare Hunting: The primary purpose of the Harrier was to hunt hares. They are scent hounds, using their acute sense of smell to follow the trail of their quarry. The breed’s size, stamina, and keen nose made them particularly adept at this task.
  2. Pack Hunting: Harriers were bred to hunt in packs, so they needed to be sociable with other dogs and able to work under the direction of a hunt master. Their pack hunting nature also makes them generally sociable and good with other dogs.
  3. Endurance and Stamina: These dogs were bred for endurance to sustain long hunts over varied terrain. They needed to be able to run at a pace that would allow hunters on foot to follow.
  4. Versatility: While their primary quarry was hares, Harriers were also used for hunting foxes and other game. Their versatility in hunting different types of game was a valued trait.
  5. Adaptation to English Countryside: The breed was developed to suit the conditions of the English countryside, capable of navigating through both open fields and dense cover.

The Harrier is similar in appearance to the English Foxhound but smaller, a trait that was likely developed to better suit the pursuit of hares rather than foxes. They share many characteristics with other scent hounds, including a friendly and even-tempered nature.

Today, Harriers are relatively rare, even in their native England, and are not as commonly used for hunting. They are appreciated as family pets due to their sociable nature, friendliness, and relatively easy-going disposition. They are well-suited to families that can provide them with sufficient exercise and outdoor activities, as they retain their hunting instincts and stamina.


Ibizan Hound

Hounds Ibizan hound

The Ibizan Hound is a lean, agile dog of the hound family. There are two hair types of the breed: smooth and wire. The more commonly seen type is the smooth.

The Ibizan Hound, also known as the Podenco Ibicenco, was originally bred in the Balearic Islands, particularly on the island of Ibiza, for hunting purposes:

  1. Rabbit Hunting: The primary role of the Ibizan Hound was to hunt rabbits and other small game. They are adept at both scent and sight hunting, using their acute senses to track and chase prey in the rugged terrain of the islands.
  2. Agility and Speed: Ibizan Hounds are known for their incredible agility and speed, which were essential traits for hunting in the rough, varied landscapes of the Balearic Islands. They are capable of making high jumps and quick turns, necessary for pursuing agile prey like rabbits.
  3. Endurance and Stamina: These hounds were bred for endurance, able to sustain long hunts over large areas. Their lean and athletic build supports this stamina.
  4. Adaptation to Island Environment: The breed’s short, smooth coat (or slightly longer wire-haired variety) and lean physique are adaptations to the warm climate of the Mediterranean region.
  5. Companionship and Loyalty: Beyond their hunting capabilities, Ibizan Hounds were also valued as loyal and affectionate companions. They are known for their gentle and friendly nature.

The Ibizan Hound has a history that likely dates back to around 3400 BC, with ancestry that can be traced back to ancient Egypt. Dogs resembling the Ibizan Hound are depicted in ancient Egyptian art, suggesting a long lineage.

Today, while they are still used for hunting in some regions, Ibizan Hounds are also appreciated as family pets. They are known for their elegant appearance, intelligence, and playful nature. They are well-suited to families and individuals who can provide them with ample exercise and mental stimulation. Due to their strong prey drive, they are best in homes where they can have space to run in a securely fenced area.


Irish Wolfhound

Hounds Irish Wolfhound

The Irish Wolfhound is a breed of domestic dog, specifically a very large sighthound from Ireland. The name originates from its purpose rather than from its appearance.

The Irish Wolfhound, known for its imposing stature and gentle nature, was originally bred in Ireland for several specific purposes:

  1. Wolf Hunting: As their name suggests, the primary role of the Irish Wolfhound was to hunt wolves. Their large size and strength made them well-suited for taking down such formidable prey.
  2. Hunting Large Game: In addition to wolves, Irish Wolfhounds were also used for hunting other large game, including elk and boar. Their great size, coupled with their speed and power, made them effective hunters of these large animals.
  3. Guarding and Protection: Beyond hunting, Irish Wolfhounds served as guardians of property and livestock. Their intimidating size and loyal nature made them effective protectors.
  4. War Dogs: In ancient times, they were also used in battle and as war dogs, valued for their bravery and power.
  5. Status Symbol: Due to their impressive appearance and rarity, Irish Wolfhounds were often kept as status symbols by nobility. They were prized and often given as royal gifts.

The breed almost faced extinction in the 19th century after the decline of wolf and elk populations in Ireland. However, careful breeding programs, particularly by Captain George Augustus Graham, helped revive the breed.

Today, while they are no longer used for hunting, Irish Wolfhounds are cherished as gentle giants and companion animals. They are known for their calm and friendly demeanor, making them well-suited to family life, despite their large size. They require ample space and moderate exercise, and their sociable nature makes them good companions, although their large size necessitates consideration in terms of living space and care requirements.


Norrbottenspets

hound dogs Norbottenspets

The Norrbottenspets, also known as the Nordic Spitz, was originally bred for hunting in the northern regions of Sweden. The breed’s development was largely influenced by the harsh climate and rugged terrain of this area, which required a dog with specific characteristics to thrive and be effective in these conditions. Here are the primary reasons why the Norrbottenspets was bred:

  1. Hunting Skills: The Norrbottenspets was primarily used for hunting small game, such as squirrels and birds. Their keen sense of smell, agility, and endurance made them excellent hunters in the dense forests and challenging landscapes of northern Sweden.
  2. Size and Agility: The breed is relatively small and agile, which allowed it to move quickly and efficiently through dense forests and over rocky terrain. This agility was crucial for tracking and chasing small game.
  3. Stamina and Endurance: The Norrbottenspets possesses remarkable stamina and endurance, traits that were essential for long hunting trips in the vast and often inhospitable northern wilderness.
  4. Adaptability to Cold Climates: With a thick double coat, the Norrbottenspets is well-adapted to the cold, harsh climate of northern Sweden. This breed can perform its duties even in snowy and icy conditions.
  5. Alertness and Independence: The breed is known for being alert and independent, qualities that were prized in a hunting dog that might need to work at a distance from its human companions.
  6. Loyalty and Companionship: Besides their hunting skills, these dogs were also valued for their loyalty and companionship, making them good pets and working dogs for the families and communities in the region.

The Norrbottenspets, like many hunting breeds, was developed out of necessity and through selective breeding practices that favored the traits needed for survival and efficiency in a specific environment and set of tasks. Today, while they may not be as widely used for hunting, they still retain many of the characteristics that made them valuable in their original role.


Norwegian Elkhound

hound breeds norwegian elkhound

The Norwegian Elkhound, a dog breed with ancient origins, was primarily bred for hunting large game, such as moose and bears, in the rugged landscapes of Norway. This breed’s development was driven by several key needs and environmental factors:

  1. Hunting Large Game: The primary and most distinctive purpose of the Norwegian Elkhound was to hunt large game, especially moose. These dogs are known for their ability to track and hold big game, barking to alert hunters and to keep the animal in place without directly attacking it.
  2. Stamina and Endurance: The Norwegian Elkhound possesses remarkable stamina and endurance, traits essential for tracking and hunting over long distances in the often challenging terrain of the Scandinavian wilderness.
  3. Cold Weather Adaptation: With a thick, double coat, the Norwegian Elkhound is well-suited to the cold, harsh climates of Norway. This adaptation was crucial for a breed expected to perform in snowy and icy conditions.
  4. Loyalty and Protective Nature: Aside from their hunting capabilities, these dogs were also valued for their loyalty and protective instincts, making them good guardians for homes and farms in rural Norway.
  5. Versatility: Norwegian Elkhounds were used not just for hunting but also as all-purpose farm dogs. Their versatility made them valuable for herding, guarding, and other farm tasks.
  6. Independence and Intelligence: This breed is known for its independence and intelligence, qualities that were important for a dog that might need to make decisions and work semi-autonomously during hunts.

The Norwegian Elkhound’s characteristics—its keen sense of smell, ability to track, endurance, and loud bark—were all honed to meet the specific demands of hunting and surviving in the Scandinavian environment. Over time, while their role as hunting dogs may have diminished, these traits continue to define the breed’s temperament and abilities.


Norwegian Lundehund

Norwegian-Lundehund-hound breeds

The Norwegian Lundehund, a unique and rare breed, was specifically bred for a very specialized purpose: hunting puffins and their eggs on remote cliffs and in rocky crevices along the coast of Norway. This breed’s development was influenced by several distinctive needs and environmental factors:

  1. Puffin Hunting: The primary and most distinctive purpose of the Norwegian Lundehund was to hunt puffins. Puffins, which nest on steep cliff faces and in hidden crevices, were a valuable resource in Norway for their meat and feathers. The Lundehund was adept at maneuvering through narrow passages and steep areas to reach the birds and their eggs.
  2. Unique Physical Adaptations: Norwegian Lundehunds have several physical characteristics that made them particularly suited for this task. They possess extra toes (polydactyly) and extremely flexible joints, allowing them to grip and climb in the precarious terrain of the cliffs. Their necks can crane backward to touch their backbones, and their forelegs can extend to the side at a 90-degree angle, all adaptations for navigating the challenging environments where puffins nest.
  3. Small Size and Agility: Their small size and agility allowed them to enter and move through the tight and twisting burrows where puffins nest.
  4. Loyalty and Trainability: These dogs were also valued for their loyalty and trainability, important traits for working closely with human hunters in challenging environments.
  5. Survival in Harsh Conditions: The breed is well-adapted to the harsh, cold climate of the Norwegian coast. Their coat is suited to protect them from the cold and damp conditions typical of their working environment.

The Norwegian Lundehund was expertly refined over generations to excel at puffin hunting, a task for which their particular set of physical and behavioral traits were ideally suited. With the eventual protection of puffins and the decline in this type of hunting, the breed’s traditional role diminished. However, the unique characteristics of the Lundehund remain, making them a fascinating example of specialized dog breeding.


Otterhound

Otterhound

The Otterhound, a breed with origins in medieval England, was specifically developed for hunting otters. This activity was essential during a period when otters were considered a pest due to their impact on fish stocks, particularly in rivers and ponds used for fishing. Here are the key reasons why the Otterhound was bred:

  1. Otter Hunting: The primary purpose of the Otterhound was to control otter populations in England. Otters were seen as a threat to fish, including those in privately owned rivers and fishponds. The Otterhound’s role was to track and hunt these otters, which was a popular sport among the nobility and also seen as a necessity for preserving fish stocks.
  2. Water Adaptability: Otterhounds are excellent swimmers, a trait that was crucial for hunting otters, which are aquatic animals. They have a thick, oily, and waterproof double coat, along with webbed feet, which make them well-suited for water work.
  3. Keen Sense of Smell: Otterhounds have an extremely sensitive nose, which was essential for tracking otters over long distances and even through water. Their ability to follow an otter’s scent trail through running water and over various terrains was a highly valued trait.
  4. Strength and Stamina: These dogs are large and robust, with the strength and stamina needed for the physically demanding task of otter hunting, which often involved long hours and challenging conditions.
  5. Loud, Deep Bark: Otterhounds have a distinctive, deep, and melodious bark, known as a bay. This loud bark was useful for alerting hunters to their location, especially in dense or marshy terrain.
  6. Good Temperament: Despite their hunting abilities, Otterhounds are known for their friendly and amiable temperament, making them good companions when not working.

The practice of otter hunting declined and was eventually banned in many countries, including the UK, as attitudes towards wildlife conservation changed and the need for controlling otter populations diminished. As a result, the Otterhound’s role as a working dog decreased significantly. Today, they are more commonly kept as companions, but their unique characteristics still reflect their heritage as specialized hunting dogs.


Petit Basset Griffon Vendeen

Hounds Petit_Basset_Griffon_Vendeen

The Petit Basset Griffon Vendéen, often abbreviated as PBGV, is a breed that originated in the Vendée region of France. It was specifically bred for hunting purposes, with a set of traits that made it particularly well-suited for hunting small game in rough terrain. Here are the key reasons why the Petit Basset Griffon Vendéen was bred:

  1. Hunting Small Game: The PBGV was primarily bred for hunting small game such as rabbits and hares. Their size, agility, and tenacity made them excellent hunters in the dense underbrush and thickets where such game typically resides.
  2. Size and Agility: The breed’s small size and agility allowed it to navigate through dense and tangled undergrowth with ease. This was crucial for pursuing game in the thickets and brambles of the French countryside.
  3. Strong Scenting Ability: PBGVs possess a highly developed sense of smell, enabling them to track game effectively over a variety of terrains. Their ability to follow a scent trail through challenging environments was highly valued.
  4. Stamina and Endurance: Despite their small size, PBGVs have good stamina and endurance, essential for long hunting expeditions. They were bred to maintain a steady pace over long periods, which was necessary for tracking game.
  5. Loud, Distinctive Bark: The breed is known for its loud, distinctive bark. This was useful for hunters to locate and follow their dogs in dense cover where visibility was limited.
  6. Hardy and Robust Nature: PBGVs are known for being hardy and robust, capable of working in harsh conditions. They needed to be resistant to the challenges of the outdoors, including variable weather and rough terrain.
  7. Good Nature and Trainability: While bred for hunting, PBGVs are also known for their amiable and playful nature. This made them not only effective hunters but also pleasant companions.

Originally, the Petit Basset Griffon Vendéen was bred from larger Griffon Vendéen dogs, with the goal of creating a smaller hound that could hunt in dense undergrowth where larger dogs might struggle. Today, while they may not be as commonly used for hunting, PBGVs still retain the characteristics that made them excellent small game hunters, and they are also valued as affectionate and lively companions.


Pharaoh Hound

Hound breeds Pharaoh Hound

The Pharaoh Hound is the national hound dog of Malta. The Pharaoh Hound, an ancient breed believed to have originated in Egypt but later developed in Malta, was primarily bred for hunting. Its name and appearance often associate it with the dogs depicted in ancient Egyptian art, though its direct lineage is a subject of debate among historians and canine experts. The breed’s development was driven by several specific needs and environmental factors:

  1. Hunting Abilities: The primary purpose of the Pharaoh Hound was to hunt small game, particularly rabbits. They were valued for their speed, agility, and keen sense of sight and smell, which made them effective hunters in the rugged Mediterranean terrain.
  2. Sighthound Characteristics: As a sighthound, the Pharaoh Hound relies heavily on its excellent vision and speed to chase and capture prey. This breed is known for its fast and efficient running, making it well-suited for coursing game in open areas.
  3. Adaptability to Harsh Climates: The breed has a short and sleek coat, which is well-adapted to the hot and dry climate of Malta and similar Mediterranean regions. This adaptation was crucial for a breed expected to perform in warm weather conditions.
  4. Independence and Intelligence: Pharaoh Hounds are known for their intelligence and independence, traits that were important for a dog that might need to hunt semi-autonomously and make decisions during the chase.
  5. Loyalty and Companionship: Besides their hunting skills, these dogs were also valued for their loyalty and companionship, making them good pets for families and working dogs for hunters.
  6. Alertness and Watchdog Abilities: Their alert nature also made them effective as watchdogs, able to warn of approaching strangers or threats.

The Pharaoh Hound’s sleek build, keen senses, and agile movements were all honed to meet the specific demands of hunting in the landscapes where they were developed. Today, while they may not be as widely used for hunting, they are appreciated for their elegant appearance, friendly nature, and athleticism, serving more as companions and show dogs.


Rhodesian Ridgeback

hounds Rhodesian Ridgeback

The Rhodesian Ridgeback, originally bred in Southern Africa, is a breed known for its distinctive “ridge” of hair running along its back. The development of this breed was driven by specific needs and conditions in the region, particularly in what is now Zimbabwe (formerly Rhodesia). Here are the key reasons why the Rhodesian Ridgeback was bred:

  1. Lion Hunting: One of the most notable roles of the Rhodesian Ridgeback was as a lion hunter, or more accurately, a lion tracker. These dogs were not used to kill lions but to track them and keep them at bay until the hunters could arrive. Their bravery, agility, and resilience made them well-suited for this daunting task.
  2. Versatility in Hunting: Besides tracking lions, the breed was also used for hunting other game, including smaller animals. Their speed, strength, and keen senses made them excellent hunting companions in the diverse African wilderness.
  3. Adaptability to Harsh Climates: Rhodesian Ridgebacks are well-adapted to hot, harsh climates. Their short and dense coat protects them from extreme heat and brush in the African bush.
  4. Protection and Guarding: These dogs were also valued as protectors and guardians of homesteads. Their intimidating appearance, loyalty, and alertness made them effective at deterring intruders and guarding livestock.
  5. Companionship: Despite their formidable hunting and guarding capabilities, Rhodesian Ridgebacks are known for their even temperament and loyalty, making them good companions for families.
  6. Endurance and Stamina: The breed possesses considerable endurance and stamina, necessary for covering long distances in hunting and tracking scenarios.

The Rhodesian Ridgeback is a result of crossbreeding dogs native to Southern Africa with European breeds brought by Dutch, German, and other settlers. These European breeds likely included Greyhounds, Bloodhounds, and possibly Terriers, contributing to the Ridgeback’s speed, tracking ability, and tenacity.

Today, while the hunting of lions is no longer a practice, the Rhodesian Ridgeback has retained its robustness, intelligence, and loyal nature. They are now more commonly kept as family pets, known for their protective instincts and suitability to active lifestyles.


Saluki

hound breeds Saluki

The Saluki, one of the oldest dog breeds, was originally bred by ancient civilizations in the Middle East, particularly in regions that are now part of Iran and Egypt. This breed, often revered in ancient societies, was developed primarily for hunting. Here are the key reasons why the Saluki was bred:

  1. Hunting by Sight: The Saluki is a sighthound, meaning it primarily hunts by sight rather than scent. They were bred for their ability to spot and swiftly chase down fast-moving prey over open terrain.
  2. Speed and Agility: Salukis are known for their exceptional speed and agility, which made them ideal for hunting in the desert. They could effectively pursue and capture fast-running game such as gazelles and hares.
  3. Endurance in Harsh Climates: Adapted to the harsh desert environments, Salukis have a lean and aerodynamic build, with a coat that can protect them from extreme temperatures. Their physical characteristics enabled them to endure long hunts in challenging conditions.
  4. Companionship and Loyalty: Beyond their hunting capabilities, Salukis were also valued for their companionship and loyalty. They often had a special status among their owners, who treated them with great respect and care.
  5. Keen Sight and Intelligence: Salukis have keen vision and high intelligence, crucial traits for hunting in wide-open spaces where they needed to make quick and independent decisions during the chase.
  6. Quiet and Reserved Nature: While being effective hunters, Salukis are known for their calm and reserved nature, making them suitable companions in domestic settings.

The Saluki’s breeding was influenced by the needs of nomadic cultures and the environment of the Middle East, where hunting for food was a necessity. Their elegant appearance, combined with their hunting prowess, made them highly esteemed by their owners. Today, while they are less commonly used for hunting, Salukis are appreciated as gentle and affectionate companions, known for their grace and dignity. Their physical and behavioral traits still reflect their heritage as skilled hunters of the ancient world.


Whippet

Hound breeds Whippet

The Whippet, a breed developed in England during the 18th and 19th centuries, was bred for several specific purposes that reflect both its hunting heritage and its role in popular English pastimes. Here are the key reasons why the Whippet was bred:

  1. Rabbit Hunting: Originally, Whippets were bred for hunting small game, particularly rabbits. Their speed and agility made them well-suited for this task, allowing them to quickly chase down and catch fast-moving prey.
  2. Ratting: In addition to hunting, Whippets were used for ratting (the sport of killing rats). This activity was popular in urban areas, and the Whippet’s agility and speed made it excel in this role.
  3. Coursing: Whippets were also bred for coursing, a sport where dogs chase after a live game or a lure. Their streamlined bodies, keen sight, and incredible bursts of speed made them excellent at this sport.
  4. Racing: Eventually, Whippet racing became a popular pastime, especially among the working class in England. Whippets are often referred to as “the poor man’s racehorse” because of their use in this sport. They were an affordable alternative to Greyhounds for people interested in dog racing.
  5. Companionship: Beyond their hunting and sporting abilities, Whippets were also valued as companion animals. They are known for their gentle and friendly temperament, making them suitable for domestic life.
  6. Size and Maintenance: The Whippet’s medium size made it a more manageable option for those who could not accommodate larger sighthounds. Additionally, their short coat is easy to maintain, which added to their appeal as pets.

The development of the Whippet was influenced by the need for a versatile, fast, and agile hunting dog that could also participate in various forms of racing and sport. Over time, while their roles in hunting and ratting have diminished, Whippets have retained their speed and grace, and today they are primarily kept as companion animals and are still active in various dog sports, including lure coursing and racing.


Shikoku

hounds Shikoku

The Shikoku, a native Japanese breed, was primarily bred for hunting in the mountainous regions of Shikoku Island in Japan. This breed, also known as the Kochi-ken, was developed for specific purposes suited to its environment. Here are the key reasons why the Shikoku was bred:

  1. Mountain Hunting: The primary purpose of the Shikoku was to hunt game in the mountainous and wooded terrain of Shikoku Island. They were especially used for hunting boar and deer. Their agility and sturdy build made them well-suited for navigating the challenging landscapes.
  2. Stamina and Endurance: Shikokus have excellent stamina and endurance, qualities that are essential for long hunting expeditions in rugged terrain.
  3. Keen Senses: Like many hunting breeds, Shikokus have keen senses, particularly a strong sense of smell. This made them effective in tracking game over various terrains.
  4. Loyalty and Trainability: Shikokus are known for their loyalty and trainability, traits that are crucial for working closely with hunters. They are known to be dedicated and focused when on the hunt, yet gentle and loyal with their families.
  5. Independence and Intelligence: The breed is also characterized by its independence and intelligence. These traits were important for a dog that might need to make decisions autonomously while tracking game in the forest.
  6. Adaptability to Local Climate: The Shikoku’s double coat is well-suited to the varied climate of Shikoku Island, providing insulation against both cold and hot weather conditions.

The Shikoku was bred by the indigenous people of Japan and has been relatively isolated, which has helped maintain the breed’s purity and distinctive characteristics. They are less known outside of Japan compared to other Japanese breeds like the Akita or Shiba Inu. Today, while they may not be as widely used for hunting, Shikokus are appreciated for their loyalty, intelligence, and natural beauty, and they continue to be a symbol of traditional Japanese canine breeds.


Hound dog breeds, revered for their exceptional hunting abilities and unique sensory capabilities, represent a diverse and intriguing class within the canine kingdom. These breeds, which have origins spanning across continents and cultures, are primarily categorized into two distinct groups: sighthounds and scenthounds.

Sighthounds, such as the Greyhound, Whippet, and Afghan Hound, are known for their extraordinary speed and keen eyesight. They were originally bred for chasing fast-moving prey, using their acute vision to track and pursue. These breeds often have a slim, streamlined build, which aids in their swift, agile movement. Their elegance and grace are as much a part of their appeal as their speed and hunting prowess.

On the other hand, scenthounds like the Bloodhound, Beagle, and Basset Hound, rely on their unparalleled sense of smell to track game. These dogs are tenacious trackers, able to follow a scent trail for miles, often used in hunting, search and rescue, and law enforcement. Scenthounds typically have a sturdy build and a more laid-back personality compared to the high-energy sighthounds.

The hound group’s history is as varied as its members, with roots tracing back to ancient Egypt, Greece, and Rome, where they were esteemed hunting companions of nobles and royalty. This rich heritage is reflected in the variety of sizes, shapes, and coat types within the group, from the sleek coat of the Saluki to the shaggy demeanor of the Irish Wolfhound.

Hounds have evolved from their primary role of hunting to becoming beloved companions and family pets. They are valued for their loyalty, affectionate nature, and often, a laid-back demeanor, particularly in breeds like the Bassett Hound. Hounds are generally known for their gentle, even-tempered nature, making them well-suited to family life.

Despite their many endearing qualities, hound breeds can present unique challenges as pets. Their hunting instincts can drive behaviors like chasing and roaming, and in the case of scenthounds, persistent howling or baying. Training and socialization can sometimes be challenging due to their independent nature, particularly in breeds bred for solitary hunting.

Overall, hound breeds offer a fascinating blend of history, skill, and personality. From the regal bearing of the Afghan Hound to the friendly and approachable demeanor of the Beagle, these breeds bring a distinct charm and character to any home. They continue to be cherished for their hunting legacy, distinct personalities, and the companionship they offer.

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Afghan Hound ; Basenji ; Basset Hound ; Beagle ; Bloodhound ; Borzoi ; Black & Tan Coonhound ; Caravan Hound ; Dachshund ; Scottish Deerhound ; Drever ; Finnish Spitz ; American Foxhound ; English Foxhound ; Greyhound ; Harrier ; Ibizan Hound ; Irish Wolfhound ; Norrbottenspets ; Norwegian Elkhound ; Norwegian Lundehund ; Otterhound ; Petit Basset Griffon Vendeen ; Pharaoh Hound ; Rhodesian Ridgeback ; Saluki ; Whippet ; Shikoku